Bob Craypoe originally wanted to be a cartoonist as a kid but that all changed when he began to play guitar at the age of 15. Although his grandfather and father both played guitar, Bob ended up teaching himself after his grandfather bought him his first guitar books. Bob taught himself music theory and guitar chords and scales, as well as how to read sheet music. The process of teaching himself allowed Bob to approach things from an analytic perspective, which in turn helped him to become more creative.

In his high school years, Bob spent a lot of time learning to play the guitar and practicing. His first musical influences included: Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, The Beatles, Jim Croce, Blackfoot, Blue Oyster Cult, Ozzy Osbourne, Black Sabbath, and Kiss.

One day, while flipping through the channels on the TV, he happened to stumble across a flamenco guitarist playing. And boy was that guy good! Bob was inspired and immediately practiced some of the techniques he just saw on TV. So a large part of his technique is the result of chance, fate, or the will of God, depending on what you want to believe.

Bob had first become interested in playing guitar due to the fact that his grandfather was so proficient at it. His grandfather, Leo J. Crepeau had played professionally for years and had played in almost every state in the United States. Bob's grandfather was a great source of encouragement for him in his early years and was so proud of Bob as he improved as a musician. Bob will never forget that and regrets the fact that his grandfather did not live long enough to see how much more he has improved since then.

After Bob's high school years, he joined the United States Army. He did basic training in Fort Knox Kentucky and learned about nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) warfare when he went to chemical school in Fort McClellan Alabama.
Bob was fortunate enough to be stationed in West Germany during the cold war. He even got to see the wall. In fact, he just missed the wall coming down when he was discharged. He almost had the chance to see history being made. But that's okay too. You see, he also just missed the Gulf War and, unfortunately, soldiers from the 92nd Chemical Company (His Unit) were among those returning home suffering and dying from the mysterious Gulf War Syndrome.

So, when Bob's wonderful three year commitment finally came to an end, he decided not to re-enlist. He wanted to see what exciting adventures civilian employers had to offer.

Bob worked an extremely wide variety of jobs after he was discharged from the Army. He's worked in factories, retail, a slaughterhouse and other somewhat interesting occupations. At least until he finally went to Dover Business College for the Computer Electronics Technician course. Then he started to do more entrepreneurial undertakings, putting his computer knowledge and skills to work.

Bob tried a few other things like his own magazine, a few different bands and then went on to do websites and a solo music career. Which leads us to here.

Bob started spelling his last name differently (from Crepeau to Craypoe) when he started to do open mics. Basically to avoid mispronunciations of his name. Occasionally, someone still manages to pronounce it wrong but those things happen. Bob views musical talent and ability as a gift from God. Not to be boasted of or used to give glory to one's self by participating in contests or talent shows. You can judge his abilities for yourself when you hear his music. Which, by the way, we sure would appreciate if you'd listen to it while you are here.

Bob now writes online articles and E-books, mostly about music, the Internet, computers and humor. He is a webmaster and the primary person behind the Craypoe.com network of websites. His proudest project as a webmaster is the Guitar4Blind website. It is a website that teaches the blind to learn guitar online with the use of screen readers. Bob has also gotten into 3D art and his work can be viewed here as well.

In January of 2015, Bob began working on the Punksters.net online comic Strip.

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